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Wooden Gate

  • April 21, 2012

Pigskinny
Pigskinny
Pigskinny
Pigskinny

It was just a gate, but a labor of love. I wanted to replace a well-made gate that had been beaten by the wind when its latch system failed and it just flopped back and forth. I had to design and build an equally well-made gate without the latch issues. With my Ryobi ONE+ tools I went to work. I used the circular saw to cut the pieces for the frame, the drill to make pocket holes and assemble the frame in a hidden fastener manner. I used the jig saw to cut the arc on the gate that I assemble using pocket holes so that the fasteners would be hidden by the frame. I pre-drilled and countersunk the holes for the stainless steel screws that I used to attach the frame to the gate body. I beveled the new posts with the circular saw for detail and positioned and drilled the holes in the posts to use the existing bolts in the stone wall. I orbital sanded all the pieces and painted them with combo paint and primer. I assembled the gate and posts with decorative stainless steel screws. I attached the specialty ordered lever door hardware and creatively conceived door stop to keep it from flopping open too far, and installed the new gate. I took my time and probably spent more than 40 hours on the project but I accomplished my goal. I have a new well-made gate and I know it closes like a door and won’t have any latch problems again.

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Wooden Gate

by Pigskinny
Apr 21, 2012

It was just a gate, but a labor of love. I wanted to replace a well-made gate that had been beaten by the wind when its latch system failed and it just flopped back and forth. I had to design and build an equally well-made gate without the latch issues. With my Ryobi ONE+ tools I went to work. I used the circular saw to cut the pieces for the frame, the drill to make pocket holes and assemble the frame in a hidden fastener manner. I used the jig saw to cut the arc on the gate that I assemble using pocket holes so that the fasteners would be hidden by the frame. I pre-drilled and countersunk the holes for the stainless steel screws that I used to attach the frame to the gate body. I beveled the new posts with the circular saw for detail and positioned and drilled the holes in the posts to use the existing bolts in the stone wall. I orbital sanded all the pieces and painted them with combo paint and primer. I assembled the gate and posts with decorative stainless steel screws. I attached the specialty ordered lever door hardware and creatively conceived door stop to keep it from flopping open too far, and installed the new gate. I took my time and probably spent more than 40 hours on the project but I accomplished my goal. I have a new well-made gate and I know it closes like a door and won’t have any latch problems again.