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WALL MOUNTED, BUILT IN CRYSTAL CABINET

  • November 8, 2016

knucklebuster
knucklebuster
knucklebuster
knucklebuster

Needed a cabinet for ongoing crystal collecting project, so I built this to accompany the built in China cabinet (also listed). This cabinet, like its sister, utilizes the wall depth to increase shelf depth (see 2nd pic, bottom shelves to outside depth difference) and keep the unit from sticking into the dining room too far, as it is mounted right next to the open passage from the dining room into the living area. I had to move the existing electrical outlet over and up when I opened the wall. Only had to cut two studs this time and then frame in the opening to accept the cabinet. Pics will indicate construction. Basically, 2 thicknesses of 3/4 poplar plywood for sides and shelves, which are dadoed, glued and screwed within the unit, (no screws visible).The back panel is 1/8 utility paneling done piece-meal, as I had no sheet big enough. I also left the top panel off until I secured the unit into the wall with four screws(2 ea.) in the sides of the top opening dados. I then slid the "bottom of the top" into the dados, thereby concealing the mounting screws. I attached the top opening rear panel from the family room behind the cabinet, reinstalled the drywall piece I had cut out for access to do all that, mudded it over and eventually painted the family room. Those pics and an even more complicated project are upcoming. The face frame is 1x 3 poplar ripped to size and the doors are 6' premium pine (couldn't get straight poplar). The pine wasn't perfect so I used 5 hinges per door for "insurance".

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Comments (1)


  • Great work on this! It really gives a nice complete feel to the space, since it's coupled with your built in China cabinet. Very impressive build- thank you for sharing!
    By RYOBI Nation, on November 9, 2016

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WALL MOUNTED, BUILT IN CRYSTAL CABINET

by knucklebuster
Nov 08, 2016

Needed a cabinet for ongoing crystal collecting project, so I built this to accompany the built in China cabinet (also listed). This cabinet, like its sister, utilizes the wall depth to increase shelf depth (see 2nd pic, bottom shelves to outside depth difference) and keep the unit from sticking into the dining room too far, as it is mounted right next to the open passage from the dining room into the living area. I had to move the existing electrical outlet over and up when I opened the wall. Only had to cut two studs this time and then frame in the opening to accept the cabinet. Pics will indicate construction. Basically, 2 thicknesses of 3/4 poplar plywood for sides and shelves, which are dadoed, glued and screwed within the unit, (no screws visible).The back panel is 1/8 utility paneling done piece-meal, as I had no sheet big enough. I also left the top panel off until I secured the unit into the wall with four screws(2 ea.) in the sides of the top opening dados. I then slid the "bottom of the top" into the dados, thereby concealing the mounting screws. I attached the top opening rear panel from the family room behind the cabinet, reinstalled the drywall piece I had cut out for access to do all that, mudded it over and eventually painted the family room. Those pics and an even more complicated project are upcoming. The face frame is 1x 3 poplar ripped to size and the doors are 6' premium pine (couldn't get straight poplar). The pine wasn't perfect so I used 5 hinges per door for "insurance".