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Tree Round Tables

  • January 8, 2015


I picked up (literally) a couple of large tree rounds from the roadside. I knew immediately what I would do with them - make tables. I let them dry for at least a year - maybe two - in the garage. The splits occurred while they were drying. I chipped off the bark with a hammer and chisel then started sanding. The sanding went on and on. It was excessive because of the large chain-saw impressions burned into the wood. I sanded until the saw marks were about 97% gone and moved on to making the tables. I used some really heavy duty vintage hairpin legs for the thinner table and used 5" rubber casters for the larger one. I used rubber so I wouldn't have to worry about metal castors scraping my wood floors. I painted them with oil-rubbed bronze spray paint to make them look a little more rustic. I used 1" shims at the attachment when necessary to balance the tables The smaller table is finished with a couple of coats of hemp oil and then five or six coats of a tongue oil mix. The larger table was finished with hemp oil only - about 6 oz total. I prefer this finish of the two. Both tables are gorgeous and I use them together as my coffee table. In regards to the sanding, it has been suggested that a router would have made quicker work of leveling out the tops of the tables. There are a lot of different techniques for doing this - I just did the one that fit with the tools and products I had immediate access to.

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      • CHISEL, HAMMER, SCREWDRIVER, RYOBI 10" SLIDING COMPOUND MITRE SAW, BELT SANDER, RANDOM ORBIT SANDER, WOOD SCREWS, WROUGHT IRON HAIRPIN LEGS, 5 INCH RUBBER SWIVEL CASTERS, LOTS AND LOTS OF SANDPAPER - 60, 110, AND 220 GRIT, HEMP OIL, TONGUE OIL MIX

Comments (1)


  • Awesome! I'm also always on the lookout for some log rounds/slices, exactly like these.
    By Tazmanic, on January 23, 2015

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Tree Round Tables

by Somewhat Quirky
Jan 08, 2015

I picked up (literally) a couple of large tree rounds from the roadside. I knew immediately what I would do with them - make tables. I let them dry for at least a year - maybe two - in the garage. The splits occurred while they were drying. I chipped off the bark with a hammer and chisel then started sanding. The sanding went on and on. It was excessive because of the large chain-saw impressions burned into the wood. I sanded until the saw marks were about 97% gone and moved on to making the tables. I used some really heavy duty vintage hairpin legs for the thinner table and used 5" rubber casters for the larger one. I used rubber so I wouldn't have to worry about metal castors scraping my wood floors. I painted them with oil-rubbed bronze spray paint to make them look a little more rustic. I used 1" shims at the attachment when necessary to balance the tables The smaller table is finished with a couple of coats of hemp oil and then five or six coats of a tongue oil mix. The larger table was finished with hemp oil only - about 6 oz total. I prefer this finish of the two. Both tables are gorgeous and I use them together as my coffee table. In regards to the sanding, it has been suggested that a router would have made quicker work of leveling out the tops of the tables. There are a lot of different techniques for doing this - I just did the one that fit with the tools and products I had immediate access to.