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Small Parts Storage Cart


Backdraft42
Backdraft42
Backdraft42
Backdraft42

I used two cabinets that I salvaged from a building that we had been using for fire training for the main cabinet. I used Harbor Freight 8 (3), 15 (2) and 20 (10) compartment storage cases.

The cabinets were originally 24” deep but were cut down to a depth of 14” using my Ryobi table saw; the width matched the width of the HF cases without any modifications. The base is 6” wider on the sides to give the cabinet some stability. I use 3” swiveling casters on each corner with two of them having locking mechanisms. Next, I used am 1/8” dado bit in my router to cut the dado’s for the hardboard I used for the cases shelves. The shelves needed a light sanding to achieve a snug fit in the dado’s.

When the cabinets were originally installed, one side had Formica applied fo give the cabinet a finished appearance. This was removed using a heat gun and putty knife; once the Formica was removed, a citrus based cleaning product was used to remove the residual contact cement. A quick sanding with my Ryobi orbital sander with 120 grit paper gave everything a smooth surface.

All open particle board edges were either faced with 1 X 3 or pine window sash moulding for a finished appearance. A piece of scrap 1/4”pegboard was used for the back of the cabinet.

I plan on painting the cabinet at some point but a color scheme has been decided on yet.

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Comments (1)


  • Really great storage solution! What stain colors are you considering?
    By RYOBI NATION, on August 23, 2018

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Small Parts Storage Cart

by Backdraft42
Aug 23, 2018

I used two cabinets that I salvaged from a building that we had been using for fire training for the main cabinet. I used Harbor Freight 8 (3), 15 (2) and 20 (10) compartment storage cases. The cabinets were originally 24” deep but were cut down to a depth of 14” using my Ryobi table saw; the width matched the width of the HF cases without any modifications. The base is 6” wider on the sides to give the cabinet some stability. I use 3” swiveling casters on each corner with two of them having locking mechanisms. Next, I used am 1/8” dado bit in my router to cut the dado’s for the hardboard I used for the cases shelves. The shelves needed a light sanding to achieve a snug fit in the dado’s. When the cabinets were originally installed, one side had Formica applied fo give the cabinet a finished appearance. This was removed using a heat gun and putty knife; once the Formica was removed, a citrus based cleaning product was used to remove the residual contact cement. A quick sanding with my Ryobi orbital sander with 120 grit paper gave everything a smooth surface. All open particle board edges were either faced with 1 X 3 or pine window sash moulding for a finished appearance. A piece of scrap 1/4”pegboard was used for the back of the cabinet. I plan on painting the cabinet at some point but a color scheme has been decided on yet.