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Shed Rebuild with Sliding Door


CamScott53
CamScott53
CamScott53
CamScott53

Off in the far reaches of my yard stood a crumbling shed badly in need of a new roof, some shoring up, and a new door.

The first order of business was to pull off the old roof- a mix of cedar shingles and corregated plastic.

After the old roof was ripped off, I sistered all the old joists and added cross members between the studs.

Once all the bracing was done, half-inch sheathing got screwed to the new joists.. I had just bought a Ryobi combo pack with a One+ drill and a 5 ½” circular saw, which was just the ticket for cutting the sheathing. Light and cordless. One+ drills are particularly useful with quick change chucks and those screw holding magnets when you’re up the ladder.

Corregated steel was our choice for the roof, to match a previous awning installation on the house, so that was cut and screwed down with my One+ drill.

With the roof and ridge cap in place, I put up soffits wit bug screen over the joist ends.

The existing door was cobbled together and hung with mis-matched hinges. I decided to try fabricating a simple sliding door using black iron pipe and skateboard wheels. There was no way I was spending hundreds on a kit.

I took some two inch wide flatbar stock and bent two J- shaped pieces wide enough to bolt the skateboard wheels through after carving out a u-shape in the wheels on my drill press so they woul ride the bar. Sandpaper wrapped over a piece of dowel worked well for this.

Luckily I wound up with a leftover piece of corregated steel (Galvalume by name) so i built a lapped cedar frame around the piece to bring it up to dimension. I also had to re-square the old frame.

Pipe mounted on the wall and rollers on the door, and voila! New shed from old.

One+ tools make working outdoors so much easier without cords to tangle and get in the way of your work.

I own at least six One+ 18v tools and will continue to replace tools with One+ versions as they age or get their cords sliced off.

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Comments (1)


  • Awesome project! Thanks for sharing it with us, along with the steps you took along the way. Looks like you were resourceful with your materials as well! Great work.
    By RYOBI Nation, on September 30, 2019

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Shed Rebuild with Sliding Door

by CamScott53
Sep 10, 2019
Medium c0f98eb2 1c3e 4168 b40c de4196e171d1

Off in the far reaches of my yard stood a crumbling shed badly in need of a new roof, some shoring up, and a new door. The first order of business was to pull off the old roof- a mix of cedar shingles and corregated plastic. After the old roof was ripped off, I sistered all the old joists and added cross members between the studs. Once all the bracing was done, half-inch sheathing got screwed to the new joists.. I had just bought a Ryobi combo pack with a One+ drill and a 5 ½” circular saw, which was just the ticket for cutting the sheathing. Light and cordless. One+ drills are particularly useful with quick change chucks and those screw holding magnets when you’re up the ladder. Corregated steel was our choice for the roof, to match a previous awning installation on the house, so that was cut and screwed down with my One+ drill. With the roof and ridge cap in place, I put up soffits wit bug screen over the joist ends. The existing door was cobbled together and hung with mis-matched hinges. I decided to try fabricating a simple sliding door using black iron pipe and skateboard wheels. There was no way I was spending hundreds on a kit. I took some two inch wide flatbar stock and bent two J- shaped pieces wide enough to bolt the skateboard wheels through after carving out a u-shape in the wheels on my drill press so they woul ride the bar. Sandpaper wrapped over a piece of dowel worked well for this. Luckily I wound up with a leftover piece of corregated steel (Galvalume by name) so i built a lapped cedar frame around the piece to bring it up to dimension. I also had to re-square the old frame. Pipe mounted on the wall and rollers on the door, and voila! New shed from old. One+ tools make working outdoors so much easier without cords to tangle and get in the way of your work. I own at least six One+ 18v tools and will continue to replace tools with One+ versions as they age or get their cords sliced off.