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Reclaimed Wood Garden Bench


amateuratbest
amateuratbest
amateuratbest
amateuratbest

My neighbor dismantled his old playset, and I saw the gorgeous 4x4x8 weathered cedar posts sitting in the gutter waiting for trash pickup. So I hustled over, grabbed a bunch, and used them to build a garden bench my wife had been wanting to park near a soon-to-be fire-pit area. After lopping off the rotted ends with my miter saw, I cut five posts to 6-foot lengths which I laid running together to form the sitting area for the bench and meted them up to two 18-inch post lengths running perpendicular to them (one on each end). I used my Kreg jig to put two pocket holes into the underside of each post, and used 2-1/4 inch wood screws to attached them flush to the end pieces, and reinforced the end pieces with three more screws along the top using the Kreg jig. Then I took the remaining post and cut it into four equal sections of 23-inch lengths, used the Ryobi cordless circular saw that I borrowed from @diy_diditrythat to cut notches in order to create a lap joint effect for the X-shaped legs that I smacked together with a mallet. I attached the legs to the base with a Ryobi Forstner bit kit to create the screw holes, sanded the sharp edges, and opted to leave it looking weathered and rustic rather than power-washing the grey away. 6-1/2 foot long custom bench that fits the space perfectly, and my wife is totally pleased with the result. Total time: 2 hours with my young kids "helping" lol. Total cost: $5 for a box of wood screws.

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Comments (3)


  • Awesome job repurposing that wood and saving some cash! Any specific plans in mind for that fire pit area?
    By RYOBI NATION, on June 19, 2018
    • Thanks! The idea is: do whatever my wife tells me HER idea is.  (am I right...?!)  ;)
      By amateuratbest, on June 19, 2018
    • Can't go wrong there! 👍
      By RYOBI NATION, on June 19, 2018

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Reclaimed Wood Garden Bench

by amateuratbest
Jun 19, 2018

My neighbor dismantled his old playset, and I saw the gorgeous 4x4x8 weathered cedar posts sitting in the gutter waiting for trash pickup. So I hustled over, grabbed a bunch, and used them to build a garden bench my wife had been wanting to park near a soon-to-be fire-pit area. After lopping off the rotted ends with my miter saw, I cut five posts to 6-foot lengths which I laid running together to form the sitting area for the bench and meted them up to two 18-inch post lengths running perpendicular to them (one on each end). I used my Kreg jig to put two pocket holes into the underside of each post, and used 2-1/4 inch wood screws to attached them flush to the end pieces, and reinforced the end pieces with three more screws along the top using the Kreg jig. Then I took the remaining post and cut it into four equal sections of 23-inch lengths, used the Ryobi cordless circular saw that I borrowed from @diy_diditrythat to cut notches in order to create a lap joint effect for the X-shaped legs that I smacked together with a mallet. I attached the legs to the base with a Ryobi Forstner bit kit to create the screw holes, sanded the sharp edges, and opted to leave it looking weathered and rustic rather than power-washing the grey away. 6-1/2 foot long custom bench that fits the space perfectly, and my wife is totally pleased with the result. Total time: 2 hours with my young kids "helping" lol. Total cost: $5 for a box of wood screws.