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Indoor Planter Stands


by9238il
by9238il
by9238il
by9238il

My wife had for years been using planks-on-glass-blocks to support her many plants throughout our long winter months, and our family room needed some organization. Building upon my previous success designing and building a basement light-grid system of wooden inserts that hung between the ceiling joists, I was able to adapt the technique to 6- floor plant stands. In both cases, I worked exclusively with Pine boards, both 2/4's and 3/4" planks (because I'm cheap), and the challenge was setting up a system for cutting the hundreds of 1/8"x 96" strips on my table saw after having notched them using my mitre saw. Not only were the strips delicate, but also vulnerable to dropping through the blade slot next to the table saw blade- I solved this problem with a narrow slot saw insert. The frames of the planters are cut from 2/4's and assembled with the help of my Ryobi nailer, which I've fallen in love with and have begun looking for additional projects to make with it! The finished polyurethaned stands with tempered-glass tops have been a huge hit around here. They are robust, solid, and nicely display the plants. I've had requests from friends to make some for them, though the 'boss' has other ideas for my skills. With each project, I learn how much I enjoy working with wood- designing, problem-solving, and constructing- and the tactile and olfactory sensations it provides. I realize this sounds weird, but fellow wood workers will understand. I'm retired now, and can't wait to tackle the to-do box.

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Indoor Planter Stands

by by9238il
Jan 14, 2017

My wife had for years been using planks-on-glass-blocks to support her many plants throughout our long winter months, and our family room needed some organization. Building upon my previous success designing and building a basement light-grid system of wooden inserts that hung between the ceiling joists, I was able to adapt the technique to 6- floor plant stands. In both cases, I worked exclusively with Pine boards, both 2/4's and 3/4" planks (because I'm cheap), and the challenge was setting up a system for cutting the hundreds of 1/8"x 96" strips on my table saw after having notched them using my mitre saw. Not only were the strips delicate, but also vulnerable to dropping through the blade slot next to the table saw blade- I solved this problem with a narrow slot saw insert. The frames of the planters are cut from 2/4's and assembled with the help of my Ryobi nailer, which I've fallen in love with and have begun looking for additional projects to make with it! The finished polyurethaned stands with tempered-glass tops have been a huge hit around here. They are robust, solid, and nicely display the plants. I've had requests from friends to make some for them, though the 'boss' has other ideas for my skills. With each project, I learn how much I enjoy working with wood- designing, problem-solving, and constructing- and the tactile and olfactory sensations it provides. I realize this sounds weird, but fellow wood workers will understand. I'm retired now, and can't wait to tackle the to-do box.