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End Grain Cutting board

  • December 15, 2017
  • Other

Sawdust&Beer
Sawdust&Beer
Sawdust&Beer
Sawdust&Beer

This is my first attempt at an end grain cutting board. I wanted to make something that would be used daily, yet last a lifetime. This is a Christmas gift for my mother in law that I hope she will like. I started with 2" thick rough sawn hard maple and walnut. I squared this up with my planner and a planner sled. Cut the peices to length with my sliding miter saw and then cut strips with my table saw. Glued up a pattern, re-planned it flat and then cut the final strips using my table saw sled. Glued up the pattern and then sanded the thing for what felt like forever! (wish I had a drum sander) For a first end grain cutting board I think it turned out pretty good. Ohh I also carved out a branding iron out of a piece of brass, that looks pretty good too..

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Comments (5)


  • Such a neat design! Both a useful and beautiful gift!

    By RYOBI NATION, on December 15, 2017

  • She will love it. Well done. I really like the fact you made your own branding iron. That is very cool.

    By mrpip, on December 16, 2017
    • Thank you mrpip. It was actually a lot easier than I expected. Finding the solid brass was the hard part but one of my suppliers for work came through for me. If you try it I would recommend cutting the stencil out with a xacto knife and using finger nail polish to put the logo onto the brass.

      By Sawdust&Beer, on December 18, 2017

  • Awesome! What did you use for finish?

    By Shrub0, on February 13, 2018
    • Just food grade mineral oil. You don't want any chemicals near food and no oils that will go rancid (such as vegetable oils). End-Grain cutting boards take quite a bit longer to make and they add a lot more waste in sawdust from the extra cuts, but they are totally worth it. If this board gets oiled regularly it should last a life time and never show any sign of wear.

      By Sawdust&Beer, on February 14, 2018

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End Grain Cutting board

by Sawdust&Beer
Dec 15, 2017
Medium 8f4f0062 c9e2 4bfb b829 cc6106ab68f2

This is my first attempt at an end grain cutting board. I wanted to make something that would be used daily, yet last a lifetime. This is a Christmas gift for my mother in law that I hope she will like. I started with 2" thick rough sawn hard maple and walnut. I squared this up with my planner and a planner sled. Cut the peices to length with my sliding miter saw and then cut strips with my table saw. Glued up a pattern, re-planned it flat and then cut the final strips using my table saw sled. Glued up the pattern and then sanded the thing for what felt like forever! (wish I had a drum sander) For a first end grain cutting board I think it turned out pretty good. Ohh I also carved out a branding iron out of a piece of brass, that looks pretty good too..