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DIY Garden Beds

  • August 29, 2016


These DIY garden beds are designed to work on top of decks or paved surfaces. Made from 2x12s, 2x6s, and 2x4s that are reinforced with L-brackets these planters are quite sturdy and drain well.

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  1. Project Steps

    1. Step: 1

      Cut the Wood I don’t want chemicals leaching into the soil so I selected untreated 2x12s, 2x6s, and 2x4s from home depot. You can make this planter in in any size you want but remember soil is heavy and moving a large planter once it is filled could be challenging. I used my compound miter saw to cut the wood to the desired lengths.

    2. Step: 2

      Screw on the bottom pieces I used my 18volt driver to drive 3.5” long deck screws through the 2x6s and into the edges of the 2x12s. I started with the ends so that the corners were reinforced and then screwed on 2x4s to complete the bottom. I left about 2 to 3 inches of space between the bottom pieces to provide drainage.

    3. Step: 3

      Paint the L-Brackets I spray painted the eight 5” L –brackets that are going to reinforce the corners. This is not essential but I like color coding different planters with different soil and plant types.

    4. Step: 4

      Reinforce the corners The inside corners of the L-brackets are a bit curved so I used a knife to carve down the edges of the 2x12s so that the brackets fit flush. I then screwed them into place using 1.25” long deck screws.

    5. Step: 5

      Add Chicken Wire I cut 2 pieces of 1” chicken wire to line the bottom of the planter. I then stapled it into place using ½” staples. The chicken wire will keep rodents from burring into the soil from underneath and will also keep the landscape cloth in place.

    6. Step: 6

      Add Landscape Cloth I stapled a piece of landscape cloth over the chicken wire. I was careful to to stretch it tight because I don’t want it to carry the weight of the soil.

    7. Step: 7

      Fill and Plant I mixed potting soil, which is lightweight with a compost mix that is nutrient dense. I planted different types of blue berry plants in each planter. I mixed the types so that they would cross pollenate. A friend of mine suggested mixing some Holly-tone into the soil to modify the PH levels.

    8. Step: 8

      screw on the 2x10s I screwed 2 pieces of 2x10 to the base after measuring to make sure they were centered.

    9. Step: 9

      Options The bushes seem to need watering ever 4 days during the hot summer months here in Boston so I will probably add an irrigation system in the future. The local birds and squirrels seem to enjoy the berries as much as I do so I will probably need to design some sort of netting as well.

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DIY Garden Beds

by Homemade Modern
Aug 29, 2016

These DIY garden beds are designed to work on top of decks or paved surfaces. Made from 2x12s, 2x6s, and 2x4s that are reinforced with L-brackets these planters are quite sturdy and drain well.

Project Steps

  1. Step: 1

    Cut the Wood I don’t want chemicals leaching into the soil so I selected untreated 2x12s, 2x6s, and 2x4s from home depot. You can make this planter in in any size you want but remember soil is heavy and moving a large planter once it is filled could be challenging. I used my compound miter saw to cut the wood to the desired lengths.

  2. Step: 2

    Screw on the bottom pieces I used my 18volt driver to drive 3.5” long deck screws through the 2x6s and into the edges of the 2x12s. I started with the ends so that the corners were reinforced and then screwed on 2x4s to complete the bottom. I left about 2 to 3 inches of space between the bottom pieces to provide drainage.

  3. Step: 3

    Paint the L-Brackets I spray painted the eight 5” L –brackets that are going to reinforce the corners. This is not essential but I like color coding different planters with different soil and plant types.

  4. Step: 4

    Reinforce the corners The inside corners of the L-brackets are a bit curved so I used a knife to carve down the edges of the 2x12s so that the brackets fit flush. I then screwed them into place using 1.25” long deck screws.

  5. Step: 5

    Add Chicken Wire I cut 2 pieces of 1” chicken wire to line the bottom of the planter. I then stapled it into place using ½” staples. The chicken wire will keep rodents from burring into the soil from underneath and will also keep the landscape cloth in place.

  6. Step: 6

    Add Landscape Cloth I stapled a piece of landscape cloth over the chicken wire. I was careful to to stretch it tight because I don’t want it to carry the weight of the soil.

  7. Step: 7

    Fill and Plant I mixed potting soil, which is lightweight with a compost mix that is nutrient dense. I planted different types of blue berry plants in each planter. I mixed the types so that they would cross pollenate. A friend of mine suggested mixing some Holly-tone into the soil to modify the PH levels.

  8. Step: 8

    screw on the 2x10s I screwed 2 pieces of 2x10 to the base after measuring to make sure they were centered.

  9. Step: 9

    Options The bushes seem to need watering ever 4 days during the hot summer months here in Boston so I will probably add an irrigation system in the future. The local birds and squirrels seem to enjoy the berries as much as I do so I will probably need to design some sort of netting as well.