• Home
  • Projects
  • Crafts & Decor
  • [#<Breadcrumb:0x00007f9ef49ae058 @title="Home", @path="/nation">, #<Breadcrumb:0x00007f9ef49add38 @title="Projects", @path="/nation/projects">, #<Breadcrumb:0x00007f9ef4ba2030 @title="Crafts & Decor", @path="/nation/projects/category/crafts-decor">]

Checkerboard


Junenward
Junenward
Junenward
Junenward

Wanted to emulate a checkerboard that my grandfather had. His was made out of floor tile (probably with asbestos). I wanted one out of walnut and poplar. Problem for me was not having a thickness planer to get consistent thicknesses on my squares. I used my joiner/planer to put a smooth finish on one side from old walnut and poplar scraps. I then used a re-saw process on my band saw to cut from 3/4" down close to 1/2" thickness. I glued the squares together with the finished faces down laying them on my table saw with a piece of newspaper between the pieces and the saw. I then glued a strip together and let it dry, then did another until all eight strips were done. Then, I cleaned up the faces and the edges and began gluing the strips together two at a time, letting them dry for an hour between each steps. Once glued I fastened them to 1/2" plywood base with screws allowing excess plywood around the edges for my edging to sit up. I then scraped the newsprint off the faces and belt sanded them down to 120 grit. Next, I added a 1/8" x 1/2" thick edging in walnut, then a 1/4" x 1/2" strip in poplar. The third strip was walnut with a rounded edge. I then trimmed off the plywood base with my table saw to be flush with the last walnut strip. Next, to finish it off I dado cut an L-shaped poplar edging leaving a 1/4" thickness on both legs of the L. The vertical leg of the L I trimmed down to leave it just below the rounded edge of the walnut strip and then rounded it off. The horizontal leg fits under the trim pieces and the plywood to allow attaching the edging and give it a rim all around the base for whatever type of pads you wish to use, felt, rubber or Teflon. The rim also then allows the board to be hung up if desired. I finished it off with 6 coats of General Finishes High Performance water based topcoat, sanding it with 400 grit between coats 2 and 3 and with 600 grit after coat 4 and 0000 steel wool after coat 5.

Show More

Print Project

Comments (2)



  • I'm impressed. Thanks for explaining, too. You are not a newbie, but I am. :)
    By simply.here.now, on April 28, 2015

Members Also Viewed

Print Options

Print Project

back to top?

Asset 1

Join RYOBI Nation

We're so glad you're here! Let's get started.

Welcome to Ryobi Nation!

Please confirm your email address.

Welcome

Let's build your project feed!

Select some categories to pick the kinds of projects that show up on your home page:


Welcome to Nation

welcome_r2 graphic
Welcome to your RYOBI Nation quick start guide, a fast and easy way to see everything that's waiting for you!
project_feed_r1 graphic
Your feed shows the latest projects from the categories you’ve selected, right on your homepage!
upload_r2 graphic
Are you working on something awesome? Upload your DIY projects today, and share with other members.
contests_r2 graphic
We award monthly and annual prizes for the best projects, worth up to $2500 in RYOBI tools! That’s a lot of hardware, and it could all be yours.
connect_r2 graphic
RYOBI Nation is a positive connection between people who are creating great things.
You can follow fellow members, like their projects, and comment to let them know they’re doing a great job.
notifications_r1 graphic
Come back to RYOBI Nation often to see what is new and to stay in touch.
If you're on a mobile device, don't forget you can add RYOBI Nation to your home screen for quick access to your project feed.

Update Image

Checkerboard

by Junenward
Mar 07, 2015

Wanted to emulate a checkerboard that my grandfather had. His was made out of floor tile (probably with asbestos). I wanted one out of walnut and poplar. Problem for me was not having a thickness planer to get consistent thicknesses on my squares. I used my joiner/planer to put a smooth finish on one side from old walnut and poplar scraps. I then used a re-saw process on my band saw to cut from 3/4" down close to 1/2" thickness. I glued the squares together with the finished faces down laying them on my table saw with a piece of newspaper between the pieces and the saw. I then glued a strip together and let it dry, then did another until all eight strips were done. Then, I cleaned up the faces and the edges and began gluing the strips together two at a time, letting them dry for an hour between each steps. Once glued I fastened them to 1/2" plywood base with screws allowing excess plywood around the edges for my edging to sit up. I then scraped the newsprint off the faces and belt sanded them down to 120 grit. Next, I added a 1/8" x 1/2" thick edging in walnut, then a 1/4" x 1/2" strip in poplar. The third strip was walnut with a rounded edge. I then trimmed off the plywood base with my table saw to be flush with the last walnut strip. Next, to finish it off I dado cut an L-shaped poplar edging leaving a 1/4" thickness on both legs of the L. The vertical leg of the L I trimmed down to leave it just below the rounded edge of the walnut strip and then rounded it off. The horizontal leg fits under the trim pieces and the plywood to allow attaching the edging and give it a rim all around the base for whatever type of pads you wish to use, felt, rubber or Teflon. The rim also then allows the board to be hung up if desired. I finished it off with 6 coats of General Finishes High Performance water based topcoat, sanding it with 400 grit between coats 2 and 3 and with 600 grit after coat 4 and 0000 steel wool after coat 5.