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Carport conversion to chicken coop


Farmer Giles
Farmer Giles
Farmer Giles
Farmer Giles

I had an unused 20x20 carport, and wanted to have chickens, so the wife and I started to enclose the
carport and have a 20x5 coop, 10x5 feed storage and a 20x10 general storage. I attached a 10x12
outside run for the chickies, we have twenty of them! The project took 3 months of working on my
days off, and also depended on having the money for materials.
The expensive part was the Hardi-board, at 30 bucks a sheet. A lot of other stuff I got on sale at Home
Depot. The exterior waterproof paint, some damaged but useable plywood for the floor, and the best
was a $600 arched window I paid $20 for. Score!
I used interior doors for access, and put in ventilation panels in the eaves. The overall project would
Not be difficult for an experienced handy person, but I did leave the wiring for power and lights to
an electrician. The coop and feed areas have a particle board ceiling, which allows me to store
long lengths of lumber above, but out of the elements.
With using Ryobi tools for the job, my only problem was not having enough batteries. It's a pain running
back and forth forgetting to take out the battery from the last tool you used, but I found a coupon, and
got 2 compact li-ions with a new drill for $99. The tools themselves are great, I have used Ryobi tools
for years.

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Comments (1)


  • I love your chicken coop. I was wondering how it has worked out for you? I promised my nephew a chicken coop as a house warming gift in December. Do you think it possible to make it with a small car port? No storage just the coop and some covered run. Thanks so much for sharing your wonderful project. Jeanette Neagu jgvneagu@yahoo.com
    By jgvneagu, on February 21, 2018

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Carport conversion to chicken coop

by Farmer Giles
May 11, 2013

I had an unused 20x20 carport, and wanted to have chickens, so the wife and I started to enclose the carport and have a 20x5 coop, 10x5 feed storage and a 20x10 general storage. I attached a 10x12 outside run for the chickies, we have twenty of them! The project took 3 months of working on my days off, and also depended on having the money for materials. The expensive part was the Hardi-board, at 30 bucks a sheet. A lot of other stuff I got on sale at Home Depot. The exterior waterproof paint, some damaged but useable plywood for the floor, and the best was a $600 arched window I paid $20 for. Score! I used interior doors for access, and put in ventilation panels in the eaves. The overall project would Not be difficult for an experienced handy person, but I did leave the wiring for power and lights to an electrician. The coop and feed areas have a particle board ceiling, which allows me to store long lengths of lumber above, but out of the elements. With using Ryobi tools for the job, my only problem was not having enough batteries. It's a pain running back and forth forgetting to take out the battery from the last tool you used, but I found a coupon, and got 2 compact li-ions with a new drill for $99. The tools themselves are great, I have used Ryobi tools for years.