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Beadboard shaker peg coat rack



I just built a coat rack that’s super functional for our family! It has a lower rack within reach of kids, an upper rack for adults, and tons of pegs for all our coats.
Step 1: Add a swath of beadboard wallpaper on the wall that is the width and height of your project. Place the wallpaper so the framing boards will overlap the edges slightly, preventing the seams from showing.
Step 2: Install two shaker peg coat racks over the wallpaper – a higher one for adults and a lower one for the kids. I ordered mine from this Etsy shop.
Step 3: Attach boards on the left and right sides of the coat racks. Attach a bottom board to serve as the baseboard. I used leftover 1×3-inch pine boards for this, screwing them into wall studs.
Step 4: Rip a piece of scrap plywood for both the top shelf and the board above the top coat rack. I used my new favorite tool to do this, the Ryobi® 10-inch portable table saw. I’m happy to report no fingers were lost in the process.
Step 5: Make your own shelf brackets out of the remainder of the plywood. I cut mine out on my miter saw. I attached the brackets using screws, but there is probably a better way.
Step 6: Use a brad nailer to attach a piece of window/door casing below the top shelf and to attach the top shelf to the brackets and back board.
Step 7: To hide the unsightly, raw edges of the plywood (and the screws in the shelf brackets), iron on a strip of birch veneer.
Step 8: Sand the rough spots, caulk the holes, and prime and paint. Done!

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Comments (1)


  • Very nice. I think I may have to find some beadboard wallpaper.
    By yvonneemueller, on March 6, 2016

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Beadboard shaker peg coat rack

by Living Rich on Less
Oct 30, 2015

I just built a coat rack that’s super functional for our family! It has a lower rack within reach of kids, an upper rack for adults, and tons of pegs for all our coats. Step 1: Add a swath of beadboard wallpaper on the wall that is the width and height of your project. Place the wallpaper so the framing boards will overlap the edges slightly, preventing the seams from showing. Step 2: Install two shaker peg coat racks over the wallpaper – a higher one for adults and a lower one for the kids. I ordered mine from this Etsy shop. Step 3: Attach boards on the left and right sides of the coat racks. Attach a bottom board to serve as the baseboard. I used leftover 1×3-inch pine boards for this, screwing them into wall studs. Step 4: Rip a piece of scrap plywood for both the top shelf and the board above the top coat rack. I used my new favorite tool to do this, the Ryobi® 10-inch portable table saw. I’m happy to report no fingers were lost in the process. Step 5: Make your own shelf brackets out of the remainder of the plywood. I cut mine out on my miter saw. I attached the brackets using screws, but there is probably a better way. Step 6: Use a brad nailer to attach a piece of window/door casing below the top shelf and to attach the top shelf to the brackets and back board. Step 7: To hide the unsightly, raw edges of the plywood (and the screws in the shelf brackets), iron on a strip of birch veneer. Step 8: Sand the rough spots, caulk the holes, and prime and paint. Done!