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Adirondak Nation


GlenJustice
GlenJustice
GlenJustice
GlenJustice

Building these Adirondak chairs has been great. The chairs are pure utility and the work is pure therapy.

I began by looking for a simple plan and came across a video by Ana White. It was a modern design and reasonably simple. I decided to try it.

I started by buying treated wood, cutting it to size on the chop saw (Ryobi, of course) and assembling. To save time, I used two drills: one with a countersink bit to pre-drill and a second to drive in the treated, outdoor screws. My wife was in charge of colors and stain, and she chose a dark java type color (I was in no position to argue).

The process worked well. I sawed up and built a prototype. Then, I sawed up two more, and kept one in pieces for use as a template. I need 12 chairs, so I wanted to simplify the process.

The only problem was cost. I was averaging $33 a chair and thought I could do better. Then, I discovered rough-cut, treated fence wood, which is far cheaper. By ripping it on the table saw and then making it smooth with an orbital sander, I cut my cost to about $25 a chair. And, I can build side tables with the off cuts.

I have built five chairs so far. Seven more to go. Lots of therapy ahead.

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Comments (2)


  • Very nice! It's incredible that you were able to cut the cost to $25 per chair, especially if you imagine the cost to purchase 12 Adirondack chairs! Very nice work, and the stain choice looks great!
    By RYOBI Nation, on May 2, 2017

  • Thanks. It's more work to pretty up all that rough-cut wood. But good fun!
    By GlenJustice, on May 2, 2017

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Adirondak Nation

by GlenJustice
May 01, 2017

Building these Adirondak chairs has been great. The chairs are pure utility and the work is pure therapy. I began by looking for a simple plan and came across a video by Ana White. It was a modern design and reasonably simple. I decided to try it. I started by buying treated wood, cutting it to size on the chop saw (Ryobi, of course) and assembling. To save time, I used two drills: one with a countersink bit to pre-drill and a second to drive in the treated, outdoor screws. My wife was in charge of colors and stain, and she chose a dark java type color (I was in no position to argue). The process worked well. I sawed up and built a prototype. Then, I sawed up two more, and kept one in pieces for use as a template. I need 12 chairs, so I wanted to simplify the process. The only problem was cost. I was averaging $33 a chair and thought I could do better. Then, I discovered rough-cut, treated fence wood, which is far cheaper. By ripping it on the table saw and then making it smooth with an orbital sander, I cut my cost to about $25 a chair. And, I can build side tables with the off cuts. I have built five chairs so far. Seven more to go. Lots of therapy ahead.