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Brian_Hicks

Member Since: 07/2017

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  1. Comment Reply: 2 months ago
    Raised Planter w/Pond : Brian_Hicks
    Thank you! It turned out to be the perfect size for my deck, adds so much color and I love the peaceful water sound. 
  2. Cancel
    • Beautifully built! This is a great size and we really like how it turned out!
      By RYOBI NATION, on August 9, 2018
      • Thank you! It turned out to be the perfect size for my deck, adds so much color and I love the peaceful water sound. 
        By Brian_Hicks, on August 9, 2018
    View All Comments
  3. Comment Reply: 3 months ago
    Japanese-inspired Tea House : Brian_Hicks
    Hi Eric, thank you! The fencing is just standard western red cedar pickets. The total height is 7.5 feet (including the lattice). The stain is Thompson's WaterSeal Woodland Cedar in semi-transparent. I originally saw a similar pattern of lattice at a local lumber store I liked, but it was absurdly expensive (something like $120 per 8 foot section), so I recreated it on my own. I believe the style is commonly called "Catalina Lattice" so if you Google search for that, similar styles should come up that you can take a closer look at. Essentially, I just set my table saw to 3/4" and ripped down strips of the same fencing boards I used to create the small strips and 3" strips for the larger sections. I used small 3/4" strips as spacers between the small strips and 3" blocks for spacers between the group of small strips and the larger boards. Depending on how tall you want to make your lattice (mine is 18" high), you'd probably need to adjust the spacing between the sections of strips. I also used stainless steel brad nails so that they wouldn't bleed onto the wood. Also, make sure the cedar boards are pretty dry before you cut the strips for the lattice – if it's too wet, they will bend really badly and look terrible. Once you get a rhythm going, it goes a lot quicker. I was able to get it down to about 1 hour per 8 foot section by the end. Hope this helps a little. Reach out if you have any other questions. Good luck!
  4. Comment Reply: 3 months ago
    Japanese-inspired Tea House : Brian_Hicks
    Thank you! It truly was a labor of love. I think my favorite part was how much I learned about how to build things correctly! I was a fairly novice DIYer at the start of the project. Without having power to the site at the start of the project, having all my RYOBI cordless tools with the same interchangeable batteries made everything go so much more quickly and smoothly. 
  5. Cancel
    • Such a beautiful backyard! We are so impressed! What was your favorite part of this project?
      By RYOBI NATION, on July 17, 2018
      • Thank you! It truly was a labor of love. I think my favorite part was how much I learned about how to build things correctly! I was a fairly novice DIYer at the start of the project. Without having power to the site at the start of the project, having all my RYOBI cordless tools with the same interchangeable batteries made everything go so much more quickly and smoothly. 
        By Brian_Hicks, on July 17, 2018

    • Awesome project...It looks great!  I'm especially intrigued by the fencing.  What's the design called?  What type of wood is it? Did you design it/custom order/find it in stock somewhere?  Would you be willing to share plans?  Thanks!
      By ericpjones_116452, on August 3, 2018
      • Hi Eric, thank you! The fencing is just standard western red cedar pickets. The total height is 7.5 feet (including the lattice). The stain is Thompson's WaterSeal Woodland Cedar in semi-transparent. I originally saw a similar pattern of lattice at a local lumber store I liked, but it was absurdly expensive (something like $120 per 8 foot section), so I recreated it on my own. I believe the style is commonly called "Catalina Lattice" so if you Google search for that, similar styles should come up that you can take a closer look at. Essentially, I just set my table saw to 3/4" and ripped down strips of the same fencing boards I used to create the small strips and 3" strips for the larger sections. I used small 3/4" strips as spacers between the small strips and 3" blocks for spacers between the group of small strips and the larger boards. Depending on how tall you want to make your lattice (mine is 18" high), you'd probably need to adjust the spacing between the sections of strips. I also used stainless steel brad nails so that they wouldn't bleed onto the wood. Also, make sure the cedar boards are pretty dry before you cut the strips for the lattice – if it's too wet, they will bend really badly and look terrible. Once you get a rhythm going, it goes a lot quicker. I was able to get it down to about 1 hour per 8 foot section by the end. Hope this helps a little. Reach out if you have any other questions. Good luck!
        By Brian_Hicks, on August 3, 2018 (edited)
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