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How to Upcycle a Changing Table Into a Desk

  • February 29, 2016

Thriftdiving
Thriftdiving
Thriftdiving
Thriftdiving

I had found this changing table at the thrift store for $12.00 when my youngest son was a baby. I don't believe in paying full price for baby items because they outgrow them so quickly. So when I had found the changing table for so cheap, I was stoked! Shortly after, he was too active to use the changing table anymore. Instead of selling it, I decided I would upcycle it into a cool desk for my oldest son! I had never upcycled a changing table before, but I knew that if I ruined it, it was ONLY $12.00 lost. No harm in that, right? Thankfully, it turned out great and was a clever way to create a workspace without having to spend any additional money!

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  1. Project Steps

    1. Step: 1

      Find a changing table that is sturdy. If you don't have any little ones, thrift stores are famous for discarded changing tables, usually for about $20 or less.

    2. Step: 2

      Trim the legs. Changing tables are tall to accommodate Mom and Dad. You'll need to use your circular saw to trim the legs down. For my project, about 3" was perfect. I used tape as a visual guide.

    3. Step: 3

      Replace the sides. Some changing tables have rounded sides that make it look like a changing table. I didn't want mine to look like a changing table so I cut the sides off and replaced them with scrap wood. I used my nailer to adhere the boards and used wood glue to fill in any gaps.

    4. Step: 4

      Remove the shelves. Changing tables have shelves to hold lots of baby supplies, but you’ll need to be able to swing a chair underneath. Remove any shelves.

    5. Step: 5

      Upcycle any parts. For this project, I upcycled one of the bottom shelves into a whiteboard by flipping it over and adhering it to the back of the changing table and used my nailer to make sure it stayed in place.

    6. Step: 6

      Reinforce the top (if needed). I wanted an even sturdier top for this workstation, so I cut a piece of MDF board the size of the changing table top with my circular saw (be sure to clamp down before cutting) and then glued the piece of MDF to the top of the changing table with epoxy glue, then painted it.

    7. Step: 7

      Paint and stencil. I used Annie Sloan chalk paint (Antibes Green) and (Florence) to paint the body of the workstation. Because it’s chalk paint, no primer or sanding was needed.

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How to Upcycle a Changing Table Into a Desk

by Thriftdiving
Feb 29, 2016

I had found this changing table at the thrift store for $12.00 when my youngest son was a baby. I don't believe in paying full price for baby items because they outgrow them so quickly. So when I had found the changing table for so cheap, I was stoked! Shortly after, he was too active to use the changing table anymore. Instead of selling it, I decided I would upcycle it into a cool desk for my oldest son! I had never upcycled a changing table before, but I knew that if I ruined it, it was ONLY $12.00 lost. No harm in that, right? Thankfully, it turned out great and was a clever way to create a workspace without having to spend any additional money!

Project Steps

  1. Step: 1

    Find a changing table that is sturdy. If you don't have any little ones, thrift stores are famous for discarded changing tables, usually for about $20 or less.

  2. Step: 2

    Trim the legs. Changing tables are tall to accommodate Mom and Dad. You'll need to use your circular saw to trim the legs down. For my project, about 3" was perfect. I used tape as a visual guide.

  3. Step: 3

    Replace the sides. Some changing tables have rounded sides that make it look like a changing table. I didn't want mine to look like a changing table so I cut the sides off and replaced them with scrap wood. I used my nailer to adhere the boards and used wood glue to fill in any gaps.

  4. Step: 4

    Remove the shelves. Changing tables have shelves to hold lots of baby supplies, but you’ll need to be able to swing a chair underneath. Remove any shelves.

  5. Step: 5

    Upcycle any parts. For this project, I upcycled one of the bottom shelves into a whiteboard by flipping it over and adhering it to the back of the changing table and used my nailer to make sure it stayed in place.

  6. Step: 6

    Reinforce the top (if needed). I wanted an even sturdier top for this workstation, so I cut a piece of MDF board the size of the changing table top with my circular saw (be sure to clamp down before cutting) and then glued the piece of MDF to the top of the changing table with epoxy glue, then painted it.

  7. Step: 7

    Paint and stencil. I used Annie Sloan chalk paint (Antibes Green) and (Florence) to paint the body of the workstation. Because it’s chalk paint, no primer or sanding was needed.