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DIY Outdoor Dining Table | Made out of Tigerwood



This DIY outdoor dining table can be made using just three power tools. A circular saw, cordless drill and orbital sander were the only power tools I needed to make this table out of tigerwood. I bought these 1” x 5-½” Tigerwood deck boards from advantage lumber. This wood is very dense and naturally resists the elements. 8-foot-long boards cost me about $23.50 each, which made this table relatively inexpensive for a table made out of solid hardwood.

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  1. Project Steps

    1. Step: 1

      Large 7e478e81 1824 457c a32a 43131f69e5a2

      CUT THE WOOD: I used a circular saw to cut the pieces to length (see drawings for reference). I used a speed square to help keep my cuts straight. I then draw an angled line down the boards and cut the leg pieces. I cut brackets to support the legs in a similar manner. I held the leg piece up to the bracket and then used the bracket as a guide to mark a line that I would then cut along.

    2. Step: 2

      Large e743c9d5 7f7c 4fd7 a67e 840fd8301065

      SET THE BLADE AT AN ANGLE: I used the leg pieces to set my blade to a matching angle and then ripped one of the deck boards in two. I used waterproof wood glue to glue these angled pieces together to make a beam that will go between the legs.

    3. Step: 3

      Large b1d0595e 11de 4b87 827f c9a5fc71cfde

      CUT MORE SUPPORTS: I set the blade back to 90 degrees and then ripped some more boards in two.

    4. Step: 4

      Large f1b6e510 a505 4c38 8a2b dbb67293fba8

      SAND THE PIECES: We used a random orbit sander to round over the edges of the pieces we cut to match the factory edges. We also sanded down the surfaces to 220 grit.

    5. Step: 5

      Large 49bbe808 1a15 46bf 8381 7444d7e6ce0a

      GLUE THE LEGS TO THE BRACKETS: We used waterproof glue to glue the leg pieces together. 

    6. Step: 6

      Large b2cb39ce b9b2 4ba7 bd20 33bd89ea43fe

      ASSEMBLE SUPPORT BEAM: We glued and screwed the support beam pieces together. We used duct tape to hold them in the right position while we screwed them.

    7. Step: 7

      Large 7ec11475 4841 452a aa96 36c54e44586e

      ASSEMBLE THE BASES: I used some steel angle brackets to reinforce the connection between the support beam and the legs. We predrilled all of our holes since this tigerwood is so dense and hard. We did a test fit with screws before adding glue and securing it all with screws. We used a flex head attachment to reach some of the hard to reach screws.

    8. Step: 8

      Large c4744541 3219 402f abb7 0cf7ab0eec0c

      ASSEMBLE THE TABLETOP: I cut the heads off of stainless steel bolts and screwed 2 nuts into the middle of the bolt. This will act as a rustproof spacer that will also help keep our warped boards straight. I made a jig out of scrap plywood so that I could consistently drill holes in the center of the boards' edges. We inserted 3 rows of these bolts and used clamps and scrap 2x4s to help force the boards in place. Once the boards where together and flat we screwed some mending plates to the underside of the table top to hold them firmly in place. These plates will be hidden by the table bases.

    9. Step: 9

      Large 1c927018 431c 4cb7 9a0d 481d955fcde7

      SCREW ON THE LEGS: We kept the tabletop upside down and then screwed through the support beams and into the table top. We also added additional support beams between the legs using some really nice star head stainless steel screws that we countersunk flush to the wood.

    10. Step: 10

      Large e0a6251e 2daf 4f1e a79e a41f8215d333

      TRIM THE LEGS: I used a 30” long plywood board to mark a straight line across the legs and then trimmed them with my circular saw.

    11. Step: 11

      Large 9cf957f8 3917 489d b250 4d340bfa24bc

      SAND: We sanded the entire table with 220-grit pads

    12. Step: 12

      Large 0768572e 4a58 4555 9d4c 24b10c9d57cd

      FINISH: We wiped away the dust and cleaned the wood with acetone before applying a coat of teak oil.

    13. Step: 13

      Large 550da562 0b07 41d2 9c99 79d01168cf6b

      TEST: It's super strong yay!

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DIY Outdoor Dining Table | Made out of Tigerwood

by Homemade Modern
Jun 07, 2018
Medium b2638bde 16b4 4bb1 bdca 3dad4b6e5c15

This DIY outdoor dining table can be made using just three power tools. A circular saw, cordless drill and orbital sander were the only power tools I needed to make this table out of tigerwood. I bought these 1” x 5-½” Tigerwood deck boards from advantage lumber. This wood is very dense and naturally resists the elements. 8-foot-long boards cost me about $23.50 each, which made this table relatively inexpensive for a table made out of solid hardwood.

Project Steps

  1. Step: 1
    Huge 7e478e81 1824 457c a32a 43131f69e5a2

    CUT THE WOOD: I used a circular saw to cut the pieces to length (see drawings for reference). I used a speed square to help keep my cuts straight. I then draw an angled line down the boards and cut the leg pieces. I cut brackets to support the legs in a similar manner. I held the leg piece up to the bracket and then used the bracket as a guide to mark a line that I would then cut along.

  2. Step: 2
    Huge e743c9d5 7f7c 4fd7 a67e 840fd8301065

    SET THE BLADE AT AN ANGLE: I used the leg pieces to set my blade to a matching angle and then ripped one of the deck boards in two. I used waterproof wood glue to glue these angled pieces together to make a beam that will go between the legs.

  3. Step: 3
    Huge b1d0595e 11de 4b87 827f c9a5fc71cfde

    CUT MORE SUPPORTS: I set the blade back to 90 degrees and then ripped some more boards in two.

  4. Step: 4
    Huge f1b6e510 a505 4c38 8a2b dbb67293fba8

    SAND THE PIECES: We used a random orbit sander to round over the edges of the pieces we cut to match the factory edges. We also sanded down the surfaces to 220 grit.

  5. Step: 5
    Huge 49bbe808 1a15 46bf 8381 7444d7e6ce0a

    GLUE THE LEGS TO THE BRACKETS: We used waterproof glue to glue the leg pieces together. 

  6. Step: 6
    Huge b2cb39ce b9b2 4ba7 bd20 33bd89ea43fe

    ASSEMBLE SUPPORT BEAM: We glued and screwed the support beam pieces together. We used duct tape to hold them in the right position while we screwed them.

  7. Step: 7
    Huge 7ec11475 4841 452a aa96 36c54e44586e

    ASSEMBLE THE BASES: I used some steel angle brackets to reinforce the connection between the support beam and the legs. We predrilled all of our holes since this tigerwood is so dense and hard. We did a test fit with screws before adding glue and securing it all with screws. We used a flex head attachment to reach some of the hard to reach screws.

  8. Step: 8
    Huge c4744541 3219 402f abb7 0cf7ab0eec0c

    ASSEMBLE THE TABLETOP: I cut the heads off of stainless steel bolts and screwed 2 nuts into the middle of the bolt. This will act as a rustproof spacer that will also help keep our warped boards straight. I made a jig out of scrap plywood so that I could consistently drill holes in the center of the boards' edges. We inserted 3 rows of these bolts and used clamps and scrap 2x4s to help force the boards in place. Once the boards where together and flat we screwed some mending plates to the underside of the table top to hold them firmly in place. These plates will be hidden by the table bases.

  9. Step: 9
    Huge 1c927018 431c 4cb7 9a0d 481d955fcde7

    SCREW ON THE LEGS: We kept the tabletop upside down and then screwed through the support beams and into the table top. We also added additional support beams between the legs using some really nice star head stainless steel screws that we countersunk flush to the wood.

  10. Step: 10
    Huge e0a6251e 2daf 4f1e a79e a41f8215d333

    TRIM THE LEGS: I used a 30” long plywood board to mark a straight line across the legs and then trimmed them with my circular saw.

  11. Step: 11
    Huge 9cf957f8 3917 489d b250 4d340bfa24bc

    SAND: We sanded the entire table with 220-grit pads

  12. Step: 12
    Huge 0768572e 4a58 4555 9d4c 24b10c9d57cd

    FINISH: We wiped away the dust and cleaned the wood with acetone before applying a coat of teak oil.

  13. Step: 13
    Huge 550da562 0b07 41d2 9c99 79d01168cf6b

    TEST: It's super strong yay!