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DIY Bar Cart



This DIY Bar Cart is made from oak boards and iron plumbers pipe and has a nice rustic modern style. This is a very simple and forgiving project to make that only requires right angle cuts and some semi precise hole drilling. This design concept of threading boards on pipes could be adapted to makes carts in a verity of different sizes. Plywood could be substituted for oak if a more affordable project was desired.

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  1. Project Steps

    1. Step: 1

      Large a5fd7bc0 27f9 4fea 9ef6 90416319556e

      Cut the oak boards I used a compound miter saw to cut 1" by12" and 1"by 2" oak boards into pieces that are 32" long. 1" by12" and 1"by 2" are nominal dimensions and these boards are actually ¾" thick and 11-1/4" and 1-1/2" wide respectively. I wanted a bar cart that is 32" long but this same design concept would work for carts as long as 48" and as short as 24".

    2. Step: 2

      Large b89819f2 316f 44c3 998b 4879e114ffd4

      Drill holes in the oak I wanted to make sure that holes for the pipes are drilled at the proper distance so I screwed 90 elbow fittings on either side of a 8" long piece of ½" diameter pipe and then used this assembly to trace the location of the holes on one of the 1" by 12" oak boards. I drilled 7/8" diameter holes about 2-½" in from the ends in all four corners. I then used the holes I drilled in the first board to trace the hole locations for the 1"by 2" pieces of oak.

    3. Step: 3

      Large 23cab596 d2e5 4c80 8308 0b09ed2a9f09

      Sand the oak I used an orbital sander with 220-grit pads to sand the oak smooth.

    4. Step: 4

      Large 1c305aff ade8 4751 be7e 17227633ffea

      Stain the oak I used a clean rag to apply a single coat of Danish oil to the pieces of oak.

    5. Step: 5

      Large bd2b9cd9 877c 43bd 8e06 b072bdfba447

      Insert wood dowels into the pipefittings I cut some short pieces of 7/8d" diameter dowel to fit inside iron pipe reducing couplings that went from ¾" diameter on one end to ½" on the other. I used "Sugru" moldable glue to fix these short wood plugs into the couplings. Construction adhesive would also work but would be a lot messier than the Sugru.

    6. Step: 6

      Large aa7c8260 98ca 4731 ac88 1e3ef86dc24f

      Assemble I threaded the short 1 ½" long pipes through the holes I drilled and then sandwiched the oak boards with couplings on either side. I used 18" long pipes for the vertical supports between the top and bottom shelves. (See pipe list in MATERIALS)

    7. Step: 7

      Large 1fa2b0c8 8ae6 4544 bc7e c7696a77b533

      Screw in the handle I should have assembled the cart upside down starting with the handle first but I didn’t so I had to fully insert one side of the 8" handle pipe into one of the elbows and then back it out and halfway into the elbow opposite to it. I had a hard time getting it aligned so I used my angle grinder to grind down one end of the pipe by about 1/8". I also could have used 2 free spinning couplings but those cost a bit more. I suggest assembling it handle first with cart upside down to avoid these hassles.

    8. Step: 8

      Large 35fc86ba 6451 4834 aaa2 350af0ccbe3b

      Drill holes for casters I flipped the cart upside down and then drilled holes in the dowels so that I could insert the stems of the bronze casters that I had.I then added additional screws through the mounting plates on the casters and into the dowels.

    9. Step: 9

      Large e8dc35c6 4927 454c a864 5088d89e3057

      Add steel rods I drilled ¼" holes in the oak rails and then cut pieces of ¼" diameter steel rod with the angle grinder and inserted them into the holes.

Comments (1)


  • I could use something like this in my shop, great job.
    By Siclestix, on January 14, 2019

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DIY Bar Cart

by Homemade Modern
Oct 26, 2016
Medium cfc3f35b 206c 4832 a4d7 adfdcbc2a512

This DIY Bar Cart is made from oak boards and iron plumbers pipe and has a nice rustic modern style. This is a very simple and forgiving project to make that only requires right angle cuts and some semi precise hole drilling. This design concept of threading boards on pipes could be adapted to makes carts in a verity of different sizes. Plywood could be substituted for oak if a more affordable project was desired.

Project Steps

  1. Step: 1
    Huge a5fd7bc0 27f9 4fea 9ef6 90416319556e

    Cut the oak boards I used a compound miter saw to cut 1" by12" and 1"by 2" oak boards into pieces that are 32" long. 1" by12" and 1"by 2" are nominal dimensions and these boards are actually ¾" thick and 11-1/4" and 1-1/2" wide respectively. I wanted a bar cart that is 32" long but this same design concept would work for carts as long as 48" and as short as 24".

  2. Step: 2
    Huge b89819f2 316f 44c3 998b 4879e114ffd4

    Drill holes in the oak I wanted to make sure that holes for the pipes are drilled at the proper distance so I screwed 90 elbow fittings on either side of a 8" long piece of ½" diameter pipe and then used this assembly to trace the location of the holes on one of the 1" by 12" oak boards. I drilled 7/8" diameter holes about 2-½" in from the ends in all four corners. I then used the holes I drilled in the first board to trace the hole locations for the 1"by 2" pieces of oak.

  3. Step: 3
    Huge 23cab596 d2e5 4c80 8308 0b09ed2a9f09

    Sand the oak I used an orbital sander with 220-grit pads to sand the oak smooth.

  4. Step: 4
    Huge 1c305aff ade8 4751 be7e 17227633ffea

    Stain the oak I used a clean rag to apply a single coat of Danish oil to the pieces of oak.

  5. Step: 5
    Huge bd2b9cd9 877c 43bd 8e06 b072bdfba447

    Insert wood dowels into the pipefittings I cut some short pieces of 7/8d" diameter dowel to fit inside iron pipe reducing couplings that went from ¾" diameter on one end to ½" on the other. I used "Sugru" moldable glue to fix these short wood plugs into the couplings. Construction adhesive would also work but would be a lot messier than the Sugru.

  6. Step: 6
    Huge aa7c8260 98ca 4731 ac88 1e3ef86dc24f

    Assemble I threaded the short 1 ½" long pipes through the holes I drilled and then sandwiched the oak boards with couplings on either side. I used 18" long pipes for the vertical supports between the top and bottom shelves. (See pipe list in MATERIALS)

  7. Step: 7
    Huge 1fa2b0c8 8ae6 4544 bc7e c7696a77b533

    Screw in the handle I should have assembled the cart upside down starting with the handle first but I didn’t so I had to fully insert one side of the 8" handle pipe into one of the elbows and then back it out and halfway into the elbow opposite to it. I had a hard time getting it aligned so I used my angle grinder to grind down one end of the pipe by about 1/8". I also could have used 2 free spinning couplings but those cost a bit more. I suggest assembling it handle first with cart upside down to avoid these hassles.

  8. Step: 8
    Huge 35fc86ba 6451 4834 aaa2 350af0ccbe3b

    Drill holes for casters I flipped the cart upside down and then drilled holes in the dowels so that I could insert the stems of the bronze casters that I had.I then added additional screws through the mounting plates on the casters and into the dowels.

  9. Step: 9
    Huge e8dc35c6 4927 454c a864 5088d89e3057

    Add steel rods I drilled ¼" holes in the oak rails and then cut pieces of ¼" diameter steel rod with the angle grinder and inserted them into the holes.