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Copper Bike Rack



This Copper Bike Rack is made from copper pipe fittings and a small piece of felt. I used an angle grinder to make two cuts along a 2" to 3/4" reducer T fitting. I soldered the cut T-fitting to a length of 3/4" copper pipe and then used a nut and bolt to connect the other end of the pipe to a 3/4" T-fitting.

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  1. Project Steps

    1. Step: 1

      Cut the Copper Pipe I used my RIDGID Tube Cutter to cut the copper pipe.

    2. Step: 2

      Mark the Cut Lines I used a Sharpie to mark two lines down the side of the 2” copper T. I made sure that the distance between the lines was wider than the diameter of the tubes that make the frame of my bike.

    3. Step: 3

      Cut the Copper T-Fitting I used my angle grinder with a metal cutting blade to cut along the lines that I drew on the T-fitting. I cut a groove along the line at first and then went back and cut through it with a second pass.

    4. Step: 4

      Clean + Prepare the Copper I cleaned the copper with steel wool and used a wire brush to rough up the ends that are going to be soldered.

    5. Step: 5

      Solder the Fitting on to the Pipe I applied flux onto the joints of the pipe and then heated the copper with my torch. Once the copper was hot, I touched the solder to the joints. I soldered both sides of the joint.

    6. Step: 6

      Sand the Cut Edges I used a sanding drum attachment on my cordless drill to smooth down the cut edges of the copper fitting.

    7. Step: 7

      Clean the Copper I used steel wool to clean up the discoloration from the soldering.

    8. Step: 8

      Attach the 3/4" T I could have soldered the 3/4” T to the other side of the pipe, but I thought I would try a mechanical connection instead. I inserted the pipe into the fitting and then drilled a hole through both the T-fitting and the pipe. I pushed a bolt through the holes and fastened it with a nut.

    9. Step: 9

      Grind Down the Bolt I used my angle grinder with a flap disc to grind the bolt down, flush to the surface of the nut.

    10. Step: 10

      Line It with Felt I had Jessie cut some felt and glue it to the inside of the copper fitting. She used 2-part epoxy and held it in place with paper clips while the epoxy cured.

    11. Step: 11

      Install the Rack I wanted to make sure that I was attaching the rack to one of the beams behind the drywall of my ceiling, so I used a stud finder to locate it. I used my Phone Works stud finder to find the center of the beams. Then I screwed 3/4” copper loops on either side of the T-fitting.

    12. Step: 12

      Hang the Bike My Linus bike fits nicely in the rack and I really love how minimal this piece is.

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Copper Bike Rack

by Homemade Modern
Sep 23, 2015

This Copper Bike Rack is made from copper pipe fittings and a small piece of felt. I used an angle grinder to make two cuts along a 2" to 3/4" reducer T fitting. I soldered the cut T-fitting to a length of 3/4" copper pipe and then used a nut and bolt to connect the other end of the pipe to a 3/4" T-fitting.

Project Steps

  1. Step: 1

    Cut the Copper Pipe I used my RIDGID Tube Cutter to cut the copper pipe.

  2. Step: 2

    Mark the Cut Lines I used a Sharpie to mark two lines down the side of the 2” copper T. I made sure that the distance between the lines was wider than the diameter of the tubes that make the frame of my bike.

  3. Step: 3

    Cut the Copper T-Fitting I used my angle grinder with a metal cutting blade to cut along the lines that I drew on the T-fitting. I cut a groove along the line at first and then went back and cut through it with a second pass.

  4. Step: 4

    Clean + Prepare the Copper I cleaned the copper with steel wool and used a wire brush to rough up the ends that are going to be soldered.

  5. Step: 5

    Solder the Fitting on to the Pipe I applied flux onto the joints of the pipe and then heated the copper with my torch. Once the copper was hot, I touched the solder to the joints. I soldered both sides of the joint.

  6. Step: 6

    Sand the Cut Edges I used a sanding drum attachment on my cordless drill to smooth down the cut edges of the copper fitting.

  7. Step: 7

    Clean the Copper I used steel wool to clean up the discoloration from the soldering.

  8. Step: 8

    Attach the 3/4" T I could have soldered the 3/4” T to the other side of the pipe, but I thought I would try a mechanical connection instead. I inserted the pipe into the fitting and then drilled a hole through both the T-fitting and the pipe. I pushed a bolt through the holes and fastened it with a nut.

  9. Step: 9

    Grind Down the Bolt I used my angle grinder with a flap disc to grind the bolt down, flush to the surface of the nut.

  10. Step: 10

    Line It with Felt I had Jessie cut some felt and glue it to the inside of the copper fitting. She used 2-part epoxy and held it in place with paper clips while the epoxy cured.

  11. Step: 11

    Install the Rack I wanted to make sure that I was attaching the rack to one of the beams behind the drywall of my ceiling, so I used a stud finder to locate it. I used my Phone Works stud finder to find the center of the beams. Then I screwed 3/4” copper loops on either side of the T-fitting.

  12. Step: 12

    Hang the Bike My Linus bike fits nicely in the rack and I really love how minimal this piece is.