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Carport conversion to chicken coop
Carport conversion to chicken coop
Carport conversion to chicken coop
Carport conversion to chicken coop
Carport conversion to chicken coop
Carport conversion to chicken coop
Carport conversion to chicken coop
Carport conversion to chicken coop
Carport conversion to chicken coop
Carport conversion to chicken coop
Carport conversion to chicken coop
Carport conversion to chicken coop
Carport conversion to chicken coop
Carport conversion to chicken coop
Carport conversion to chicken coop
Carport conversion to chicken coop
  • Carport conversion to chicken coop
  • Carport conversion to chicken coop
  • Carport conversion to chicken coop
  • Carport conversion to chicken coop
  • Carport conversion to chicken coop
  • Carport conversion to chicken coop
  • Carport conversion to chicken coop
  • Carport conversion to chicken coop
  • Carport conversion to chicken coop
  • Carport conversion to chicken coop
  • Carport conversion to chicken coop
  • Carport conversion to chicken coop
  • Carport conversion to chicken coop
  • Carport conversion to chicken coop
  • Carport conversion to chicken coop
  • Carport conversion to chicken coop

Carport conversion to chicken coop

I had an unused 20x20 carport, and wanted to have chickens, so the wife and I started to enclose the
carport and have a 20x5 coop, 10x5 feed storage and a 20x10 general storage. I attached a 10x12
outside run for the chickies, we have twenty of them! The project took 3 months of working on my
days off, and also depended on having the money for materials.
The expensive part was the Hardi-board, at 30 bucks a sheet. A lot of other stuff I got on sale at Home
Depot. The exterior waterproof paint, some damaged but useable plywood for the floor, and the best
was a $600 arched window I paid $20 for. Score!
I used interior doors for access, and put in ventilation panels in the eaves. The overall project would
Not be difficult for an experienced handy person, but I did leave the wiring for power and lights to
an electrician. The coop and feed areas have a particle board ceiling, which allows me to store
long lengths of lumber above, but out of the elements.
With using Ryobi tools for the job, my only problem was not having enough batteries. It's a pain running
back and forth forgetting to take out the battery from the last tool you used, but I found a coupon, and
got 2 compact li-ions with a new drill for $99. The tools themselves are great, I have used Ryobi tools
for years.


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